Psychology

THE problem of mind in our everyday experience we give presumes a series of aspects relating to both the mental and the physical world: there is a physical world comprised of a multiplicity of distributed objects in a vast space. According to Joseph Stiglitz, who has experience with these questions. Moreover, the existence of the physical world is independent of our knowledge about the same. To refer to this circumstance, we often say that the physical world exists objectively. In addition, we mental experiences such as beliefs, desires and emotions, volitions. Get more background information with materials from Professor of Economics. The set of these experiences usually refer us alternately as being internal, mental life, psyche, mind, subjectivity, etc. Our mental experiences cause part of our conduct, insofar as they represent causes of our bodily movements and other voluntary action (verbal behavior, expressions, etc.) Our mental experiences are in part influenced by aspects of the world.

In fact, we perceive and distinguish objects while there is light, the same ones that disappear in the absence of that; We feel an unpleasant sensation of coldness at low temperatures; We feel a dreadful feeling of pain before contact with fire; etc. We manage a complex network of cognitive representations that are reflected in a concomitant lexicon. In such a network, we can distinguish between physical and mental categories, expressed through physicalist terms (stones, water, hardness, pressure, colliding, evaporate, etc; and through Mentalists terms (see, feel, pain, joy, sadness, thinking, wanting, imagine, neurotic, creative, intelligent, consciousness, mind, mental, etc.)) Relationships of causality between the physical and the mental at a pre-teorico level however, in a step something more reflective, but always within the same pre-teorico level, postulate some asymmetry at the time attributed to the physical and mental universes existence: the attribution of reality to the physical universe is an indisputable fact, to the extent that we can perceive through our sensesIE: see it, hear it, touch it, measure it, weigh it, etc.