Internet

Today, the majority of computers of any organization are connected in network. Also, almost all networks that exist in the world also are interconnected; in this way arises Internet, also known as the network of networks or, simply, the network. The Internet is a network that interconnects millions of computers around the world. To do this, use different physical media, such as: telephone lines, fiber optics, satellite links, terrestrial waves, etc. The core or heart of the Internet is composed of a series of supercomputers located in different cities of the world and connected through high-speed connections. Such connections are known as superautopistas of information, also called by the term backbone or Internet backbone.

Each of the supercomputers of the backbone connects others a little less powerful, which belong to national or regional networks. In turn, these latest others are connected still smaller and, thus, to computers running Internet users. If this has piqued your curiosity, check out Tony D. Bartel. It is not necessary that a computer belongs to a LAN or a WAN to connect to Internet. For example, any person of a foot can connect your home PC to the Internet, without need to belong to any network. The connection is carried out via a contracted Internet access account to a vendor or company that offers that service, and a server of that undertaking will be the hitch to the Internet. Most Internet access providers also offer many other services, such as: email, hosting of web pages, etc. On the network, when from a computer sends a message (information) to another, that message is decomposed into several pieces of information, called packages. They will travel on the Internet the fastest possible way to reach their destination, where the message will be recomposed.

This road does not have to be the same for all packages, since this will depend of the the network traffic. Nodes that pass packets are those who control such traffic and, therefore, are they who determine the next node to which have to contact each packet to reach its destination. Most of the packages that circulate on the Internet pass through the backbone.